Leaning on the Experts

#INFO233 PLN Post 2

One of the first “libraryish” things I did after getting the teacher librarian position at my school was to attend an information literacy workshop put on by California State University San Marcos librarians. The presenters offered to deliver an information literacy workshop to all the librarians in my district, so we jumped at that opportunity.

The timing was perfect. Our district librarians were in the midst of developing district-wide research practices for each of us to deliver to our individual school sites. And as we made decisions about what skills to focus on, we had these CSUSM librarians to guide us. So far, it has been a match made in heaven and I am very thankful for the work CSUSM is doing with local school districts.

Now, as a way to deliver what we are learning about research practices to our school sites, all the librarians in our district are working together to build this Research Toolkit (work in progress!). I am co-presenting this toolkit next week with my librarian colleague Stephanie Macceca, but the creation and organization of this website (and the work it represents) was shared among all nine of our district librarians.

Here is what this process is making me realize about my professional learning network: I am far from the smartest, most capable person in the network of librarians I belong to. I don’t mean to come off as too egotistical, but I’m used to being near the head of the group when it comes to the different subjects my personal learning network is dealing with:

  • Developing literacy? I’m on it.
  • Integrating technology to amplify learning? I’m ready to train others!
  • Developing prompts and assessments? You’re talking my language!

I’m used to catching on quickly and (if necessary) doing a lot of the heavy lifting. But this first big project with my fellow librarians is reminding me that I have a lot to learn, and I can learn from the amazing colleagues I work with. I don’t have to be near the front of the pack in all areas of my PLN. I’ll admit, I kind of like being near the front of the pack and helping others catch up. But there’s no way to sugar coat it: I am a novice in the librarian world.

As I’ve worked with the librarians in my district to build the Research Toolkit, it has become abundantly clear that I could NEVER have done this on my own. I cringe a little remembering telling a fellow librarian: “I’ve got time this summer–I may just build the whole website myself!” I made that comment in a state of ignorant hubris. What made me think I could, on my own, develop this research resource for use across the entire district? The website we’re building together is so much better than what I could have done on my own.

I’m very glad for this experience. Without experiences like these, I worry that I would become the kind of person who feels like an expert at everything–the kind of person who thinks others should look to to learn from, but who doesn’t need to learn much from others. I would hate to become that kind of person. Of course, I don’t want to feel completely inept and ineffective, but I do hope to always stay in touch with the ability to be vulnerable and admit that I don’t know and that I need help.

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